Jerome V. Farris, 4687 Maple Court, Camdenton, MO 65020 jerome@rhoadselectrical.com 573-346-2180

What Is Electricity?

Electricity Surrounds Us: we are accustomed to coexisting with both natural phenomena (lightning, static electricity …) and artificial phenomena (the lighting of our homes, the operation of electrical appliances and machines …).

In today’s society, it is an integral part of every aspect of life. When we are missing, we realize how our life revolves around it. Based on a good blog in electrical industry, without electricity, most of the technical advances that we enjoyed could not have been developed, and the kind of life we would lead would be completely different.

Electric power both domestically and in industry, electric light, and a large number of objects that work thanks to electricity and have caused that today, heat is essential.

So important is that a challenge that all societies have today is to produce electricity sustainably, since the energy consumption, specifically electrical energy, maintained by the most developed countries is impossible to continue much longer.

Elements Of Maneuver And Control

The control or maneuver elements are devices that allow us to open or close the circuit when we need it. These are some examples:

  • Table with symbols and images of maneuver and control elements.
  • Switches : A switch (simple), allows to open or close a circuit and remains in the same position until we press again.
  • A double or bipolar switch is a switch that opens and closes two circuits at the same time.
  • Images and symbols of the switches.

 Example : In the following cases you can check the operation of the switches:

Operation of the simple switch.

Example of the use of a double or bipolar switch, which closes two circuits at the same time.

  • Push buttons.
    • A button permits you to open or close the circuit only while we are acting on it. When we stop pressing, it returns to its initial position.
    • Normally open push button (NO):
    • In the idle state, the circuit is free, and it closes when pressed.
    • Normally closed pushbutton (NC):
    • In the idle state, the circuit remains closed, and it opens when pressed.

Electric Driving: That’s How You Know Which Charging Station You Should Have

Electric driving is on the rise, and as a result, the number of charging stations in the Netherlands is also increasing. But how does that work? Which plugs do you need and what do you pay? And how do you get such a pole at your house?

More and more you see them, especially in a  big cities: parked electric cars next to a charging station.

Because the number of plug-in hybrids and fully electric vehicles is increasing, partly due to tax benefits, the number of charging stations in the Netherlands is also rising. Although the installation of charging stations according to the leading Foundation is not fast enough, there are now almost 6,000 charging stations where owners of electric cars can ‘refuel.’

Of these, there are over 3,500 public charging points that are accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The number of semi-public charging points, for example, supermarkets, is about 2,250. The availability depends on opening hours.

The number of fast-charging stations, where batteries can be charged within half an hour, is still very limited in the Netherlands, with just over 100 units around the turn of the year.

Where the charging stations are located, you can find on the site Oplaadpalen.nl, which also has apps for iOS and Android. You can use the corresponding route planner to map out a route from spot A to B that runs along charging stations so that you do not get stranded along the way.

You can also find out which charging stations are suitable for your car. Some electric vehicles can charge fast with direct current, such as the Nissan Leaf. Others can do that with alternating current, such as the Renault Zoe. Different charging stations are required for both cars, with different plugs and various capacities.

How do you know which charging station you should have? To make this clear, an explanation of the different charging methods is necessary.

Four Different Charging Methods

With electrical charging, you often come across the designation ‘modes.’ This means the technique that is used for charging. There are four different modes, the first three of which work with alternating current coming from the socket. Method 4 works with direct current.

  • Mode 1 is charging with a standard 220 Volt power supply with a maximum of 10 Amps. This is not used for charging electric cars in principle, because no current limiter limits the load on the network. This makes it relatively unsafe.
  • Mode 2 is charging with a fixed current limiter. This usually takes place at a standard socket or via a charging station at home. In the cable supplied with the car, a box with a current limiter is usually installed.
  • Mode 3 is checked loading. Communication takes place between the car and the charger and only when a suitable charging current is ‘agreed’ between the car, and the charging pole is voltage applied to the socket. Mode 3 loading is therefore much safer than mode two loading.
  • Mode 4 is charging with direct current. The charging port is in direct contact with the car battery and determines the entire charging process. Because the electricity network supplies alternating current, there is an inverter in the charging station. In mode 1, 2 and three the inverter is in the car itself.